Category: wildlife

On the International Day of Forests, we honor …

On the International Day of Forests, we honor our connection to these remarkable places. From the water we drink and the houses we build to the vital space they create for wildlife, forests are part of our lives every single day. Johanna Hendrickson took this photo while exploring the Olympic National Forest in Washington. “One thing I love about being in the forest,“ she explains, ” especially on a foggy spring day, is how quiet it is. All you can hear are your footsteps and occasionally the eerie call of a sooty grouse off in the distance.” Olympic National Forest is managed by our friends at the U.S. Forest Service. Photo courtesy of Johanna Hendrickson.

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Black Naped Monarch

Black Naped Monarch

Cougars/Mountain Lions Range and Sightings.

Cougars/Mountain Lions Range and Sightings.

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Oh deer! We can’t hide from another birthday p…

Oh deer! We can’t hide from another birthday post!

March 14 marks the birth of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Things looked a lot different back in 1903 when President Theodore Roosevelt established the first national wildlife refuge on Pelican Island in Florida to protect wild birds. But today, the National Wildlife Refuge System, managed by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is a premier network of public lands, with over 567 wildlife refuges in each state and territory. They support thousands of iconic plants and animals, local communities and outdoor adventure. It’s probably easier than you realize to visit a local wildlife refuge, and what better day to plan your next trip than today? Photo courtesy of Dawn Wilson.

Most of us will never see a lynx. Though found…

Most of us will never see a lynx. Though found in Alaska, most of Canada and some states along the northern border and in the Rockies, these majestic cats are rare and elusive. If you catch a glimpse of one in the snowy forest, look for their long legs, large paws, long dark tufts on the ears and a short, black-tipped tail. Excellent hunters – hare are their primary prey – they’ll probably see you before you see them. Photo by Sara Germain, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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