Category: national wildlife refuge

Morning frost clings to tall grasses at Chase …

Morning frost clings to tall grasses at Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge in North Dakota. Half water and half rolling hills, Chase Lake plays an important role in the conservation of the American white pelican, hosting a large breeding population in the summer. Those big white birds won’t be back for a few months, but there’s still lots to see and do at the refuge. Sunrises are a great way to start the day. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

This red fox at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wil…

This red fox at Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey is enjoying a lazy Sunday morning. We can learn so much from nature. Photo by Don Freiday, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Whooping cranes are the tallest and some of th…

Whooping cranes are the tallest and some of the most rare birds in North America. Adults are mostly white and stand almost five feet tall with a wingspan of seven feet. Never an abundant species, the total population dwindled to a low of 16 birds in 1941 due to hunting pressures and habitat loss. Now there are about 600 in the world. These three adults and one juvenile were spotted at Quivira National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas. Photo by Barry Jones, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

In the remote Pacific Ocean, low-lying atolls …

In the remote Pacific Ocean, low-lying atolls and islands are critical havens for seabirds and marine wildlife. Protected places, like Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, provide a safe place for seabirds and seals alike to raise their families and rest from their long voyages foraging at sea. Photo of an endangered monk seal and Laysan albatross hanging out on the beach by Dan Clark, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Autumn is a spectacular time to visit Santee N…

Autumn is a spectacular time to visit Santee National Wildlife Refuge with its cypress forest turning shades of red. This wildlife refuge is located on the north shore of Lake Marion – the largest lake in South Carolina – and is home to a wide diversity of wildlife species. It’s a major wintering area for ducks and geese, as well as a nesting and stopover area for neo-tropical migratory birds, raptors, shore birds and wading birds. Visitors can take in the amazing fall colors, try their luck fishing in Lake Marion or enjoy the sight and sounds of all the birds. Photo by Marc Epstein, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

It’s fall at Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National …

It’s fall at Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge in Mississippi. The morning air is cool and crisp. Deer weave through the forest and squirrels scamper around searching for winter stores. Sunrise light hits the yellow leaves, making them an even brighter shade of gold. It’s a wonderful moment of peace. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The rolling plains and scattered wetlands of N…

The rolling plains and scattered wetlands of Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge in Montana were created by receding glaciers more than 12,000 years ago. Today, these lands and waters serve as habitat for a great variety of wildlife, especially migrating waterfowl. Depending on the season, the sky can hold a lone eagle, fill with waves of tundra swans or show dramatic sunset colors. Photo by Christal Steele (www.sharetheexperience.org).

Forested hills slope down to the banks of the …

Forested hills slope down to the banks of the mighty Mississippi River at Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge in Iowa. The yellow leaves of maple trees are catching the sunlight, providing a lovely and soothing atmosphere for hikers, anglers, kayakers and photographers. Other autumn visitors include thousands of migrating birds pausing at the refuge as they make their way south. Photo by Jessica Bolser, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Happy Halloween! Let’s celebrate with this sca…

Happy Halloween! Let’s celebrate with this scary cute baby arctic fox at Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Arctic foxes are found in two color phases: white and blue. White-phase foxes appear brown in the summer and pure white in winter. Blue-phase foxes appear gray in the summer and a lighter gray in the winter. Blue-phase foxes are uncommon, so this photo is a rare treat. Photo by Ryan Mong, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

More often seen than heard, owls are amazing b…

More often seen than heard, owls are amazing birds. 🦉 The eastern screech owl has some of the best camouflage – even the sharpest eye might not see it in the trees. It tends to roost in a hollow or in dense foliage near the trunk, and its colors range from gray to reddish brown. Its call is a long quivering whistle, so keep your ears open even if you can’t spot this owl. This one was photographed at New York and New Jersey’s Wallkill River National Wildlife Refuge, which is home to grassland birds, migrating waterfowl and wintering raptors. Photo courtesy of Herb Houghton.